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Ed Finegan

Instructors

Ed Finegan

Professor Emeritus
University of Southern California

Edward Finegan researches discourse analysis, language in law, and language variation and change. Also a professor at the USC College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, Professor Finegan teaches Lawyering Skills.
 
Professor Finegan’s current research projects include investigations of the relationship between register variation and social dialect variation, of the history of attitudes toward language correctness, and of ethical practices in forensic consulting. He is the author ofLanguage: Its Structure and Use, 5th ed. (Thomson/Wadsworth, 2008) and co-author ofLooking at Languages, 4th ed. (Thomson/Wadsworth, 2008) and Longman Grammar of Spoken and Written English (Longman, 1999).
 
Professor Finegan completed post-doctoral work at Harvard Law School, where he was a Liberal Arts Fellow concentrating on law and linguistics. He has served as an expert to many leading law firms, particularly on matters of defamation and trademark. He is editor-designate of Dictionaries: The Journal of the Dictionary Society of North America and is president-elect of the International Association of Forensic Linguists.

Events

  • Guest Lecture by Peter Sokoloski, Editor-at-Large, Merriam-Webster

    Thursday, July 23, 2015 -
    9:15am to 10:15am

    The Dictionary as Data: What the Online Dictionary Tells Us About English

    Peter Sokolowski, Editor-at-Large, Merriam-Webster
    https://twitter.com/PeterSokolowski

    Time: July 23, 9:20-10:20, Harper 140

    What makes a person look up a word? When do you use a dictionary? Looking up a word in the dictionary is an intimate act for each of us as individuals, but the words sought by millions of users put together tell us a surprising story about the English language. By watching trends of lookups on a heavily consulted online dictionary, lexicographers track which entries are being consulted at any given moment. Some words are perennial sources of curiosity, while others show spikes of interest triggered by news from the worlds of politics, entertainment, and sports. Some words express the general mood of the culture; others reflect a poignant specificity. At the same time, this Web traffic tells a story about the changing business of dictionaries -- and what is expected of a dictionary in the 21st century.